Candidate Guidance

Businesses move fast and it is tough to write a two page CV after your years in business so focus the CV to the opportunity on offer. Write each as a response to the individual advertised post; a generic CV is just that, a job description cites an individual role in differing companies and unless you are lucky your CV will only be a partial match at first glance. Clarity of response makes you stand out.

Your CV is the opportunity to explain the relevant parts of your career that match the role criteria. If you have to explain further in a covering letter it shows you are not focused on delivery of accurate initial data and willing to only give a near match! Your attitude should be “Here is the perfect match to your job specification.”

Make sure the highlights in your career path stand out and are relevant to the job offer. Alternatively, everyone tries to hide something their CV; do you have answers to any gaps in yours? Everyone has a learning phase in a new role, can you demonstrate how quickly you pick up the needs of a business through your CV timescale. Can you quantify your impact on the business?

You must get the basics of your CV correct. Don’t use txtspk ok? Spell check your CV against English language rather than Microsoft’s American English. Don’t use non- standard industry acronyms in your CV they may be relevant to your current employer but not so to any new one.

If the worst should happen and occasionally it does; but we all hope it doesn’t: If you get that job you thought you really wanted and then you suddenly decide it is all one big horrendous mistake, admit the error and move quickly. Then both the damage to your career structure and the company business prospects which were dependant on you will be mitigated.